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Glenn B. Wheaton
2009-Jul-15 Wed, 02:24
Aloha All,

I believe this year’s Roulette Entrainment was fairly landmark. The consistency displayed in our multiple Roulette successes in Las Vegas means we are in-fact “Not Gambling” anymore. I have been thinking about all this for awhile now and there are a few things we can do to optimize our activities. First I would like to make a few changes to the structure of our plays. I would like to limit the number of people involved in the Entrainment itself to only three. That means we will need to have a least two teams since we usually go to Las Vegas with 6 to 8 people. It is important that we get everyone prepared to be a leader of the 2nd team. In the past you may have just been player 2 or player 3 and only had to follow the lead of player one. Leading means you will have to speak and give directions and encouragement to the other players. You need to know the game itself, the rules the plays and be alert to all the plays of each player, even those not in your group. It’s the leader’s responsibility to keep everyone’s attention on the active entrainment. If you don’t watch the Entrainment it will collapse. Keep in mind we are linking the physical reality and chaos to an affinity that we stand up. If we don’t observe the Entrainment globally it can’t stand up. You must not only observe your specific bets but the bets of your team players and to a lesser degree the bets of any other players. You must observe the entire structure of the Entrainment bets as a single observation.

This can be hard to do so I want to do some training on spatial observation. You can get a bit ahead of the game if you will learn more about the structure of the Roulette playing field itself. Ideally given a pen and paper you should be able to create a graphic representation of the entire Roulette playing field with all numbers, colors, and play lines identified. You need to take this entire playing field to blackboard and place it in visual memory. In theory we should be able to verbally state bet one, two, and the field bets, and place them on blackboard mentally and determine without paper whether or not we completed the Entrainment or lost the effort. It will be the most difficult for player three. If I bet Red, Dick bets the 2nd twelve, player three should know the specific numbers they will bet in the 2nd twelve field without looking. While it may sound difficult it is not. We have plenty of time to absorb this information, I would prefer it to be learned and not memorized. When we learn to observe at this level of play it will certainly put an edge on the Entrainment. Knowledge is power and given our current performance levels we have done well, but we can do much better. I think we can do well enough to get kicked off a table and perhaps be asked to leave. We play for 60 minutes or 90 minutes at the table minimums so we have never been a real threat, but if instead of $5 bets, we laid down $200 bets and won the Entrainment bet. That would be an $8000 win, minus $1000 for the player three over bet and we take a $7000 gain. This kind of action would rattle the nerves of the average player, it could cause some serious mental concern, but we are not gambling. If we were to lose such a bet, you cannot care, must not care. On our next trip to Las Vegas we will place such a bet, at least once during our play. We will win this bet, and you can’t let it rattle you. You just have to watch it happen. It is very important therefore that we all improve on our ability to watch. I will pick the time, when we have a croupier that is weak and we have the table momentum we will jump the stakes and place $1600 dollars on the table, don’t even think about it just let it happen.

Glenn

ufojoe
2009-Aug-23 Sun, 21:38
Hi Glenn,

I am currently staying at the Golden Nugget for a month as I am working on a show here in Vegas. I asked one of the floor managers what they would do if somebody was consistently winning on roulette. She said that if the surveillance didn't show anything out of the ordinary, (cheating or screwing with the wheel) they wouldn't do anything. But who knows? It would certainly be fun to find out. Maybe they'd send in a cooler?

This floor person told me that there used to be a roulette spinner at the Flamingo who could place the ball within six slots on the wheel, consistently. And if you tipped him, he would come through for you.

Joe


Aloha All,

I believe this year’s Roulette Entrainment was fairly landmark. The consistency displayed in our multiple Roulette successes in Las Vegas means we are in-fact “Not Gambling” anymore. I have been thinking about all this for awhile now and there are a few things we can do to optimize our activities. First I would like to make a few changes to the structure of our plays. I would like to limit the number of people involved in the Entrainment itself to only three. That means we will need to have a least two teams since we usually go to Las Vegas with 6 to 8 people. It is important that we get everyone prepared to be a leader of the 2nd team. In the past you may have just been player 2 or player 3 and only had to follow the lead of player one. Leading means you will have to speak and give directions and encouragement to the other players. You need to know the game itself, the rules the plays and be alert to all the plays of each player, even those not in your group. It’s the leader’s responsibility to keep everyone’s attention on the active entrainment. If you don’t watch the Entrainment it will collapse. Keep in mind we are linking the physical reality and chaos to an affinity that we stand up. If we don’t observe the Entrainment globally it can’t stand up. You must not only observe your specific bets but the bets of your team players and to a lesser degree the bets of any other players. You must observe the entire structure of the Entrainment bets as a single observation.

This can be hard to do so I want to do some training on spatial observation. You can get a bit ahead of the game if you will learn more about the structure of the Roulette playing field itself. Ideally given a pen and paper you should be able to create a graphic representation of the entire Roulette playing field with all numbers, colors, and play lines identified. You need to take this entire playing field to blackboard and place it in visual memory. In theory we should be able to verbally state bet one, two, and the field bets, and place them on blackboard mentally and determine without paper whether or not we completed the Entrainment or lost the effort. It will be the most difficult for player three. If I bet Red, Dick bets the 2nd twelve, player three should know the specific numbers they will bet in the 2nd twelve field without looking. While it may sound difficult it is not. We have plenty of time to absorb this information, I would prefer it to be learned and not memorized. When we learn to observe at this level of play it will certainly put an edge on the Entrainment. Knowledge is power and given our current performance levels we have done well, but we can do much better. I think we can do well enough to get kicked off a table and perhaps be asked to leave. We play for 60 minutes or 90 minutes at the table minimums so we have never been a real threat, but if instead of $5 bets, we laid down $200 bets and won the Entrainment bet. That would be an $8000 win, minus $1000 for the player three over bet and we take a $7000 gain. This kind of action would rattle the nerves of the average player, it could cause some serious mental concern, but we are not gambling. If we were to lose such a bet, you cannot care, must not care. On our next trip to Las Vegas we will place such a bet, at least once during our play. We will win this bet, and you can’t let it rattle you. You just have to watch it happen. It is very important therefore that we all improve on our ability to watch. I will pick the time, when we have a croupier that is weak and we have the table momentum we will jump the stakes and place $1600 dollars on the table, don’t even think about it just let it happen.

Glenn

Glenn B. Wheaton
2009-Aug-23 Sun, 23:19
Aloha Joe,

I think it is indeed a challenge to be consistently successful at any game in Las Vegas. What I think would rattle them is the fact that we play as a group and so there could be an additional suspicion were we to start winning consistently big. For me, and I don’t speak for everyone, it is not the money but the ability to win that I fancy. The odds are crazy and still millions gamble there each year. Perhaps it is ego to some degree but I would like to approach any table game and have the same chance of winning as the House. Vegas doesn’t gamble, it is a sure thing that because of the odds against those that gamble that there is a degree of certainty with the percentage that they will get. They merely facilitate those that do gamble. It is always best to look for the finite and not the infinite. I prefer to be player one and only bet Red. Entrainment allows the Red bet to win, not because of the odds, but because I bet it. Roulette has become quite the playground since we have learned how to watch it play.

For my folks I believe the teaching point is to show them the way to navigate the Roulette environment, not to win large sums. I think if that was our prime focus then we could not keep our minds where they need to be to be able to win. Give me a table with a weak Croupier and we can rock. Believe it or not, and I think you already know, that Croupier’s have all spun the wheel enough to know something is afoot and what they do matters. They can help you win or they can stop you from winning. You just can’t spin that wheel thousands of times and not feel the changes. Our plan is to outnumber and outmaneuver the Croupier on the same level he plays.

Glenn

J.P.
2009-Aug-24 Mon, 12:55
Glenn.... I know you're thought of this before, but I want to run it by you, just for the sake of talking about roulette.

Have you ever tried to just intuit the spin of the ball in this game? Like just trying to "see" or feel which will come out, black or red? I know you have great abilities when it comes to just straight intuition, and this method I'm talking about could also be a good training ground for other applications.

I've read of the interesting stories of you "tagging" something where you just take a quick look at it on blackboard and then go from there. I would imagine a method like this could be taught to your students at the HRVG and then also use this method could be used in life in general, to help solve problems... and whatever else is needed.

There are dowsers who can visualize a pendulum in their mind's and can use this "mental pendulum" to dowse as good as if they had a real one in their hands. Using a mental pendulum in Vegas could also be another viable method for doing some damage at the roulette table. I've read articles on "deviceless dowsing", so there's more than one way, besides the mental pendulum to get this done.

Any thought's on this?

Glenn B. Wheaton
2009-Aug-25 Tue, 02:21
Aloha JP,

Most people aren’t really “Forces of Nature” and tend to wobble a bit under pressure, especially when you go against “Vegas”. While I have seen demonstrated skill in myself and others not many can stand toe to toe with the patterns of the sheer psychology that surfaces when you challenge on just your wits alone. If you have nerves of steel and absolute control of your intellect then you may last a bit longer but alas that is not the challenge we are taking. Our goal is to actually enter the flow of the game itself and let the game itself pick us to win. We do this by introducing order to the chaos of this very non-random game. I can walk up to the table and place a 4-tiered bet and win it but I can’t do that into infinity. I must deal with the finite and only when I am in the game can I play for an extended period. Many people stand at the table and put their money down but they aren’t really “In the Game”. To get in the game you must understand it and find its flow. Even chaos has a momentum and when the wheel spins and the ball drops it has force. Its force is not changed by someone placing a bet or picking a number. Chaos seeks order and that is the way to beat the game. I don’t know about others but I have a certain amount of intuition that fades rapidly after about 90 minutes. When we play in a group I conserve it and let others in the team use theirs. As player one I merely take a stand on Red and hold it there. Twelve (12) reds in a row is about the best I can do, then Dick or Jason will tap me out and take my place as they both are very good at black. It is an ebb and flow and knowing how to read the flow is very important to be able to win. Holding Red is not hard for me, but it is player two (2) that really drains their intuition by consistently picking which 3rd of the field the Red number will hit in. Debra, Dick, Jason, Anne, and Maria do very well as player 2, but they fade after 5 or 6 plays and need to swap with player 3 and recharge a bit.

When Player 2 makes a wrong decision it is less a decision than a failure to stand up affinity. If player 2 blinks then player 3 just lost a good deal of cash. Player 2 bets where they want the win to hit and this is a different function of intuition than a flash of where it will be. Their intuition backfills into the game and chaos meshes with it to achieve order that the wheel and ball will become complicit with. Player 2 is actually the carrier for the collective game chaos. Players 1, 2, and 3 use physical actions combined with mental discipline to stand up an abstract of consciousness which is a gravity the wheel and ball cannot escape. I said it is an ebb and flow but when our minds are right it ebbs and flows toward our actions and away from the Croupier and the wheel and ball.

Those wanting to beat the table by some exercise of mind like dowsing or some other technique will fatigue fast so they should play in short cycles and be more of a shark just darting in to get a win here and there. If you try to go toe to toe I would bet the house will prevail.

Glenn

J.P.
2009-Aug-25 Tue, 11:40
Aloha JP,

Most people aren’t really “Forces of Nature” and tend to wobble a bit under pressure, especially when you go against “Vegas”. While I have seen demonstrated skill in myself and others not many can stand toe to toe with the patterns of the sheer psychology that surfaces when you challenge on just your wits alone. If you have nerves of steel and absolute control of your intellect then you may last a bit longer but alas that is not the challenge we are taking. Our goal is to actually enter the flow of the game itself and let the game itself pick us to win. We do this by introducing order to the chaos of this very non-random game. I can walk up to the table and place a 4-tiered bet and win it but I can’t do that into infinity. I must deal with the finite and only when I am in the game can I play for an extended period. Many people stand at the table and put their money down but they aren’t really “In the Game”. To get in the game you must understand it and find its flow. Even chaos has a momentum and when the wheel spins and the ball drops it has force. Its force is not changed by someone placing a bet or picking a number. Chaos seeks order and that is the way to beat the game. I don’t know about others but I have a certain amount of intuition that fades rapidly after about 90 minutes. When we play in a group I conserve it and let others in the team use theirs. As player one I merely take a stand on Red and hold it there. Twelve (12) reds in a row is about the best I can do, then Dick or Jason will tap me out and take my place as they both are very good at black. It is an ebb and flow and knowing how to read the flow is very important to be able to win. Holding Red is not hard for me, but it is player two (2) that really drains their intuition by consistently picking which 3rd of the field the Red number will hit in. Debra, Dick, Jason, Anne, and Maria do very well as player 2, but they fade after 5 or 6 plays and need to swap with player 3 and recharge a bit.

When Player 2 makes a wrong decision it is less a decision than a failure to stand up affinity. If player 2 blinks then player 3 just lost a good deal of cash. Player 2 bets where they want the win to hit and this is a different function of intuition than a flash of where it will be. Their intuition backfills into the game and chaos meshes with it to achieve order that the wheel and ball will become complicit with. Player 2 is actually the carrier for the collective game chaos. Players 1, 2, and 3 use physical actions combined with mental discipline to stand up an abstract of consciousness which is a gravity the wheel and ball cannot escape. I said it is an ebb and flow but when our minds are right it ebbs and flows toward our actions and away from the Croupier and the wheel and ball.

Those wanting to beat the table by some exercise of mind like dowsing or some other technique will fatigue fast so they should play in short cycles and be more of a shark just darting in to get a win here and there. If you try to go toe to toe I would bet the house will prevail.

Glenn

Thanks for the great explanation Glenn. It's always a pleasure having you describe in such a detailed way what's going on as you work your "magic" in Vegas!

ufojoe
2009-Aug-25 Tue, 19:46
Thanks for the great explanation Glenn. It's always a pleasure having you describe in such a detailed way what's going on as you work your "magic" in Vegas!

Yeah, really interesting stuff. Thanks, Glenn.

Do roulette team members have to have any natural ability on the psychic side in order for the system to work?

How can I view the presentation on entrainment online?

Dick Allgire
2009-Aug-25 Tue, 20:12
Yeah, really interesting stuff. Thanks, Glenn.

Do roulette team members have to have any natural ability on the psychic side in order for the system to work?

How can I view the presentation on entrainment online?

You ask if the team members have natural ability. We are all remote viewers and we have all trained together and worked many RV targets, many RV projects together. If you want to judge the ability of the viewers look at every public demonstration at every IRVA conference, where an HRVG viewer has nailed the target, or look at Courtney Brown's current project. We meet every week and eat and talk and joke around together. We practice roulette before going to Vegas. I think everyone has some natural ability. It's more about who puts the work in.
Manny Ramirez is the first one in the batting cage every day taking practice swings.

Email me personally about the presentation.

Aloha,

Dick

Glenn B. Wheaton
2009-Aug-26 Wed, 01:42
Aloha Joe,

I think that a psychic sense is a plus in any endeavor. I also think it is important to say that what we are there to see is not the wheel, ball, or the playboard, or the winners or losers. We are actually there to see the manifestation of something we use the game to create, “Affinity”. One cannot ignore the lights, and sounds, the wheel spinning, the ball slinging around, but looking through all that we are there to see the footprint surface of our minds at work. We know what it will look like based on our actions and so we look for it to surface. I suppose belief would be more important because of how it postures your mind. It becomes a scenario where what you are there to see can only be seen if you look. The Guild folks are much better at Roulette now than when we first began so it is something that they have learned and that means the training does matter. The group think becomes more important than an individual natural ability.

Glenn

ufojoe
2009-Aug-30 Sun, 08:09
Email me personally about the presentation.

Aloha,

Dick

I sent you a personal message last week. I don't have your email address.

Dick Allgire
2009-Aug-30 Sun, 20:22
JOe,

Too much connectivity. Email, bulletin boards, messages, My Space, Face Book, Twitter. Sheesh.

Let me get to the personal messages here on HRVG (which I don't check enough) and get to you. Sorry.

Dick