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Dick Allgire
2010-Mar-05 Fri, 20:34
What You Think And How You Think Changes After You Learn Remote Viewing

Iím not the same person I was when I began remote viewing 13 years ago. My mind doesnít work the same; itís different. Thereís an old joke. You hang your tongue out the side of your mouth, curl your lips, cross your eyes and twitch and say, ďhasnít, hasnít, hasnít, hasnít affected me at all.Ē Har har.
But it has affected me. Iíve activated something, switched something on that opens the channel of non-local awareness without my conscious intention to hear it.

I have a couple of examples that occurred in the last week.

Last Friday I flew to the island of Lanai to do some reports for the news. A news photographer and I were booked on Island Air, flying aboard one of the De Havilland Dash 7 twin engine island hoppers with the high wings. I had a seat right under the wing, looking out on the landing gear. As we taxied out I became intrigued with the mechanical workings of the landing gear. I recall sitting there wondering, ďHow many redundant systems do they have to command that wheel to retract?Ē I thought, ďhow old are the hydraulic lines? How often do they replace them?Ē I wondered what the components were made of, titanium, or aluminum? Trunnions and hinge assemblies fascinated me. I had never considered these things, and didnít even understand what they were.
It was a bit spooky. Thinking about landing gear failure is not a pleasant thought onboard a plane accelerating down the runway. But I took out my video camera (a violation of regulations) and shot video of the landing gear retracting. When we landed on Lanai I shot more video of the gear deploying, and rolled until we safely touched down. Remember Richard Dryfuss making a model of Devilís Landing in ďClose Encounters?Ē That was me with the landing gear. I had a short but intense fascination with landing gear assembly and function. But it just seemed a way to pass the time on a short interisland flight. I didnít understand the significance until later.

We got off the plane and spent a long and difficult day shooting stories on Lanai. Our departure was scheduled on Island Air for 3:20. We were trying to get a story back for the 6 PM news, cutting it close. The flight was delayed until 4:!5. We bitched and grumbled. The flight was delayed again. More complaining as we waited around the small airport.

Finally the plane boarded just before 6 PM. A flight attendant apologized for the long delay and said, ďAll of us were supposed to finish our shift at 9 PM, but weíll be working until midnight, so we know how you feel. Letís get you airborne and Iíll explain why weíre so late.Ē

We took off and got to altitude. The flight attendant told us why the airlineís schedule was so backed up. Earlier that day, about the time we were flying to Lanai, a similar aircraft took off from Honolulu. He told us that the pilot tried to retract the landing gear and it would not move. They tried to do in manually. It wouldnít budge. They flew around for quite some time with one wheel down, trying to figure out why the gear would not function properly. There was apparently much discussion over the radio about the mechanical aspects of landing gear function. The plane circled for a long time, finally landed back in Honolulu and was taken out of service while they repaired the gear. The loss of this aircraft threw the entire interisland schedule out of whack. As this was explained to me I recalled my thoughts on the earlier flight. I took out my camera and looked at the many photos I had taken of the landing gear. (PHOTO ATTACHED. I TOOK VIDEO OF THE GEAR BEFORE BEING INFORMED THERE WAS A PROBLEM ON ANOTHER FLIGHT.) The landing gear had not malfunctioned on our flight. It was another flight, but same airline, same type of plane.

Yesterday I had a day off and hired a videographer to help me shoot a music video in the Manoa forest. We took my guitar, video equipment, sound gear, tripods, mic stand to the Manoa Falls Trail head. (Look it up on Google Earth, itís a spectacular place.) We found a beautiful location not far from the end of the road, along the beginning of the trail. There was a beautiful stream at the bottom of a steep embankment.

As we were setting up a group of Japanese hikers came by. We said hello. There were several older ladies and quite a few younger hikers. They took pictures of the cameraman and me with my guitar, and then set off to hike. We prepared for the video shoot. We rolled on a few takes, about 30 minutes. Because of the lighting the cameraman wanted a different shot and had me back up a few feet. I looked over the steep hillside down to the stream below. I was not anywhere near the edge but suddenly I flashed on losing my footing and tumbling down the ledge. I wasnít in any danger of slipping, but for several seconds I had the visceral, first hand, intimate experience of losing balance and falling out of control. I felt it for several seconds. It was unnerving. It was like I remembered what it was like to tumble down an incline to my death, my body catching on roots, striking rocks, the feeling of sudden terror and helplessness.

I shook my head and brought myself back to reality and we continued shooting. Sometime later during a final take I heard a siren wailing. It got louder, and closer. The camera was rolling while I was lip synching to audio (we werenít recording for sound) and I didnít want to waste a take, so I kept going. The siren got louder and I saw flashing lights out of the corner of my eye and heard a loud engine rumble to stop just a few meters away. Out came a fire rescue crew. They hoisted their gear and took off up the trail in a rush. Try to picture this. In the rainforest, not far from the road, Iím strumming a guitar singing a song in Thai, with a camera on a tripod pointed at me, music blaring from a boom box and the Honolulu Fire Department rescue squad roars up. They jump out and run past me. Funny if werenít tragic.

While we had been taping one of the Japanese visitors who weíd seen earlier, an older lady had fallen down an embankment. She slipped and fell over the edge and later died.

I had known about the landing gear failure, and I had felt the terror of the woman falling to her death.

When you remote view you develop a psychic antenna. You learn to use it and it becomes a part of your every day life. Iím trying to learn how to identify the thoughts that are activated by this skill. Mostly I know it after the fact, when the flight attendant tells us about the landing gear problem, after I hear the siren. How to identify these thoughts at the moment they occur?

How many thoughts do you think in a day? Our minds are like pinball machines- one thought triggers another, and that triggers another. What is the source? I donít understand it, but I know how I think, and what I think has changed because of the years of remote viewing.

Glenn B. Wheaton
2010-Mar-06 Sat, 00:52
Aloha Dick,

Itís a bit amazing when you think about how far you have traveled this last decade. In class two weeks ago the Guild had quite a treat with the viewing of your conference presentation from 2009. Your best years are indeed in the now and I think you know that. So much freedom to think the thoughts of your mind and share them. When we were younger we could have easily been dispatched to the Looney bin and that has kept a great many capable minds from emerging and pointing to the things that are obvious to those that can see. In the valley of the blind the one-eyed man is king but in the world of the mind it is the global mind that obtains true awareness. Too many in their shells and beliefs which stop exploration. When you begin to sense the linkage between observation and reality you become part of a greater landscape. I think the greater landscape is calling you and you are answering.

Glenn

Glenn B. Wheaton
2010-Mar-06 Sat, 00:58
Aloha Dick,
I am very sorry for the accident resulting in the death of the Japanese woman. It came to mind that you saw here just before her accident. I didnít catch the news broadcast but I am wondering if you had to do the story on the anchor desk?
Glenn

Michele
2010-Mar-06 Sat, 03:49
What You Think And How You Think Changes After You Learn Remote Viewing

Iím not the same person I was when I began remote viewing 13 years ago. My mind doesnít work the same; itís different. Thereís an old joke. You hang your tongue out the side of your mouth, curl your lips, cross your eyes and twitch and say, ďhasnít, hasnít, hasnít, hasnít affected me at all.Ē Har har.
But it has affected me. Iíve activated something, switched something on that opens the channel of non-local awareness without my conscious intention to hear it.


Great post! I'm getting ready for work, so I don't have time to get all the finer details, but I'm always reminded of the scene with the medical examiner in Men in Black when Will Smith says the line about "How many times have you flashy thinged her?" That whole scene is almost as good...

mj001jk
2010-Mar-08 Mon, 20:21
Aloha, and nice job on the Thai song! :-)
Jim K.

J.P.
2010-Mar-10 Wed, 21:42
Good stories Dick....you've been posting ones like this for the longest time. It's a shame more RVers don't post stories.... I'm have sure they have them, of what changed for them while develing into the psychic worlds of RV.

Sita
2010-Mar-15 Mon, 06:49
Hmmm, I should change that subject..haha...Hi Dick, JP, Jim, Michelle, et al,
Nice post. Dick, I think your natural abilities have been enhanced through the tool of remote viewing. You have always had a natural ability to foresee things and remote viewing brings it out more frequently. I think these "synchronistic" events happen to all of us more frequently. I still get the chicken skin feeling when I glance at my clock and see it at 11:11 or 4:44....thank you for sharing...very interesting information:)

Sita

Wodin
2010-Mar-15 Mon, 07:39
I still get the chicken skin feeling when I glance at my clock and see it at 11:11 or 4:44....thank you for sharing...very interesting information:)

Sita

Yup! It happend to me just yesterday!

Wayne