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Dick Allgire
2010-Mar-26 Fri, 22:51
We're taking on a new student in The Netherlands. It seems to me that this should be a good place to remote view. I like the name.

T h e N E T H E R lands

Anyway, as Coen sets up his desk to begin remote viewing he asked about what type of pen and paper he should use. I sent him this message. I felt it might be good to share with everyone.

PEN AND PAPER

Coen,
I have to let you in on a secret. We do teach you to get fanfold computer paper and a certain type of ballpoint pen, and the sense of using special tools and having a ritual IS important.

We could also require you to use only charcoal made from burning a particular type of wood at midnight under a full moon. And we could tell you that good remote viewing data only comes from using this charcoal on a scroll made of papyrus. If you believe making marks only with charcoal created by burning special wood under a full moon at midnight on a papyrus scroll, then that belief would help you remote view better.

It is your MIND that will do this, not the pen and paper. It is your intent.

If you take the time to get a certain type of pen, and use a certain type of paper that makes the act a little more special. They dress up the Bishop in a big fancy hat and special garments to conduct the mass. They burn incense. The mass is better because of that and people buy into it better than if the Bishop wore a pair of jeans and an old T shirt. It is still just a man speaking Latin.

But when you sit down with a pen and paper that you bought specially for this task, it is a communication to your subconscious that you are going to embark on something special.

And you are going to embark on something special.

Aloha,

Dick

Robert
2010-Mar-31 Wed, 09:19
Dick:
I like your reply to Coen. I know when I first took the HRVG course I had many questions as to how to proceed and what if I didn’t use fanfold paper (expensive here) and just used the reams and reams of copy paper I already had; was this going to negate my session? But what worried me the most was the “Patter.” I tried to remember ever word and say it to myself exactly as it was written as I went through each page step by step. Always, by the end of the remote viewing session, I was fatigued. I felt so wiped out I seldom looked forward to doing another remote viewing target. It got to the point that I just stopped thinking about it and went on auto drive; every line, every comma and semi colon was put down automatically without any thought to doing it. I cannot say my sessions got any better; if anything they got worse because there was no focus and focus was, and still is important in the RV process. I still ask myself, “Is it possible to do an RV session and come out of it refreshed and NOT fatigues?” Perhaps not; maybe it’s just the nature of the beast.
I do wonder how many other remote viewers and old timers here experience the fatigue I am talking about.

Robert

Coen
2010-Mar-31 Wed, 15:25
What I've read is that when a remote viewer finishes their session, they have a fleeting and satisfied feeling. To me it sounds really interesting - once I get to Stage VI - that I will have worked a complete session and not only be tired but at the same time calmed when returning from that Theta state in Edging (right?).

In any case, I like doing this and have worked two targets so far and I am looking forward to the next one!

Dick Allgire
2010-Mar-31 Wed, 19:34
What I've read is that when a remote viewer finishes their session, they have a fleeting and satisfied feeling. To me it sounds really interesting - once I get to Stage VI - that I will have worked a complete session and not only be tired but at the same time calmed when returning from that Theta state in Edging (right?).

In any case, I like doing this and have worked two targets so far and I am looking forward to the next one!

Coen,
Good questions.

First of all, you will develop stamina and “mental and psychic muscle” by training and doing many sessions. In the beginning you will be mentally fatigued by doing 15 minutes into Playfair.

Later, this will just be the warm-up and completing Playfair will be the launch point for the real fun.

Generally, I sit down with a stack of clean paper and an empty mind. Having the need, want, and desire to discover things about the target is important. At the opening of any session, when I’m working Visual Ideograms and probing Spontaneous Ideograms I often feel inadequate, thinking: “I’m not getting much about this target.” But the protocols are designed to keep you plugging away, step-by-step so that your data becomes more and more complex and detailed. So you can’t worry about drawing an indistinct blob in your first Visual Ideogram. Just do the next thing in the long sequence of the structured session.

When I complete a session I usually do have a sense of satisfaction. Sometimes working a remote viewing target is like trying to do a crossword puzzle with no clues and you don’t know how many letters you should use. On a good night you get caught up in the data and without thinking too much about it, it just flows out of you. In very good sessions you look back at what you’ve put down and don’t specifically remember the details but you have a knowledge that you often can’t quite put into words. Example: I saw people doing what seemed to be an autopsy. But I just knew that the event had religious overtones involving worship of the corpse. An extreme juxtaposition of gross mortality combined with spirituality.

The target was an Egyptian mummification process at the Valley of Kings. That I saw this in the “now” across the centuries still haunts me.

Sometimes you feel a sense of sadness and dread. Sometimes you feel a sense of elation. I remote viewed honeybees on flowers and felt like a hungry person finding a field full of Godiva chocolates. Other times you go away with more questions than answers. At the conclusion of any really good session ideas and revelations about the target keep coming at you. Many a time a viewer has called a monitor after driving home, an hour after they wrapped up a session, to add details that occur to them after they’ve finished. It catches up to you.

Last night I spent an hour reworking one gestalt from a target I had already spent 5 hours on. My mind was so flooded with concepts I couldn’t grasp and I spent another 30 minutes writing just 2 or 3 pages. There is a reason S-4 is called CASCADE. I could have worked all night, but it was late and I had to be at my day job in a few hours.

Remote viewing is about tedium and curiosity being paid off with wonderment. If you can’t put in the hard work, and you’re not curious, and wonderment doesn’t rock your boat, then take up another hobby. I my experience about 1 out of a 100 people have the intelligence, will put up with the grueling repetition of protocol methodology, have the curiosity, have the persistence, have the intuitive spark to become remote viewers.

Coen
2010-Apr-01 Thu, 05:06
At the opening of any session, when I’m working Visual Ideograms and probing Spontaneous Ideograms I often feel inadequate, thinking: “I’m not getting much about this target.” But the protocols are designed to keep you plugging away, step-by-step so that your data becomes more and more complex and detailed. So you can’t worry about drawing an indistinct blob in your first Visual Ideogram. Just do the next thing in the long sequence of the structured session.
Does that mean the ideogram is not so much connected to the rest of the stages? I.e., even if you think your ideogram is bogus, you can still continue?


The target was an Egyptian mummification process at the Valley of Kings. That I saw this in the “now” across the centuries still haunts me.
You sure know how to motivate your students Dick. ;)


Last night I spent an hour reworking one gestalt from a target I had already spent 5 hours on.
When you do this, do you restart the entire session? Or do you just continue where you left off? Do you cool down before you get to that, or can that be skipped with your mind being so full of the data?


Remote viewing is about tedium and curiosity being paid off with wonderment. If you can’t put in the hard work, and you’re not curious, and wonderment doesn’t rock your boat, then take up another hobby. I my experience about 1 out of a 100 people have the intelligence, will put up with the grueling repetition of protocol methodology, have the curiosity, have the persistence, have the intuitive spark to become remote viewers.
I know you didn't mean this as a personal statement to me, but I want to comment anyway; I feel I have all those things you mention here. But I won't lie, nor hide it, I am quite skeptic I will be able to get good data at this point. But you know what? That just makes me work harder and more focused!

When I applied for Rapid Reaction Forces military training twelve years ago (I was 25 back then) I didn't look at what I couldn't do; The fact that I had a pretty severe kidney op at age 6 which impairs my ability to gain dexterity in sports; That I have a limited capability to take in schooling; That all my life I've been told I was able to do whatever I want but I just didn't have the discipline or willpower (don't get me started, I still have bad dreams about this). I looked at what I could do and trained my @$$ off. One day, after about 3 months of intensive training and running/jogging, about 2 weeks before I had my first medical test, I had run/jogged so hard I fell to the ground on the sidewalk; I was exhausted - that, and realizing "I am ready.". I will say it on the record, I might not be able to remote view in the end, but I won't quit until the fat lady sings, or you (Dick) will tell me it's hopeless. If you don't give up, I won't. Period.