PDA

View Full Version : Monday Night's Class...



Glenn B. Wheaton
2011-Feb-10 Thu, 02:53
Aloha All,

Monday night’s talk was meant to make you think a little deeper about the remote viewing process and the nature of the data that could be collected. There is a sense throughout the remote viewing community that somehow the data that you collect must be true when in-fact there is absolutely no reason to trust the data as being truth. There is a distinct possibility that a viewer could easily collect coherent pathologic data with the same clarity as other data from the target and based on its placement within the methodology it could lead the viewer astray as to the true nature of the target. Lies, deceptions, ruses, and premeditated intentions could just as easily be collected as baseline truths. This is less of a problem for us here at Hrvg than elsewhere because we employ an analytic process on our collected works.

The total absence of an analytic process in the greater community is currently the greatest threat to the integrity of the remote viewing product. This coupled with the lack of advanced applications keep production quality at the level of the concepts outlined in the CRV and other manuals. Understanding the remote viewing process is in and of itself an evolution of mind for the viewer. In collecting and evaluating endless sessions over a decade we learn to comprehend global conceptuals related to our target. If I as the tasker publish a target and you capture the major plots and characters but fail to realize that it was chapter 6 from Mark Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn”, a fictional story, do you think you missed something very important? In recent work I have seen a few brave souls reach a global conclusion about their target work. This is the turning point where the viewer sees the coherence of their target contact and spins up their comprehension to a global perspective. The pieces lose their individuality and you comprehend in batches. Some years back in an evening class I gave a test of sorts to see who was processing data globally. Some of you will remember the night I stood at the white board and wrote out a long series of letters that seemed to be unrelated. I began like this…

S S N P Y P B A G L O O A S D W E T K T D I M S
S O T H S T T A D C T B A W C I C O T S L L

Somewhere much further into the stream of letters someone from the back of the room in a weak unsure voice barely audible said “Starry Starry Night”. This is exactly how the data bubbles to clarity from our brushes in the ether at target. To focus on the bits will limit you to a “Bit”. You must let the data flow and attempt to process it in chunks or batches. A second exercise that night in class was a reading of a selected text a single letter at a time. I read very slowly but just a letter at a time. The class was tasked to simply copy the letters I spoke on their paper. I was not able to get to the end of the paragraph before the 15 or so students in the room were hopelessly lost in writing what I was saying. They had begun to read the letters and suss out the words and in doing so lost their ability to stay with the flow of the data. This is the pitfall for the viewer in the collection process. Collect in the microcosm and record in the microcosm but seek coherence in the macrocosm.


Glenn